LIVE from Bordeaux: BAM performs research in zero gravity

Ready for take-off: Prof. Jens Günster and his team are looking forward to get the 30th Parabolic Flight Campaign of the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) startet

Source: BAM, Section Corporate Communications

22 seconds weightless 31 times in a row experienced the team of Prof. Jens Günster, Head of the Ceramic Processing and Biomaterials Division and high-performance ceramics professor at the TU Clausthal. He and his colleagues participated in the 30th Parabolic Flight Campaign of the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) and carried out tests on additive manufacture under microgravity conditions.

3D printing has never been explored in weightlessness – BAM, DLR and Clausthal University of Technology are pioneers.

Prof. Günster answeres the most important questions about the project.

The "Powder-based additive manufacture under weightlessness" project produces components by applying layers of a flowable powder using 3 D printing... Read the full interview here.

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BAM and DLR reported live on the parabolic flights from Bordeaux and on the tests under hashtag #BAMzeroG and #DLRparabelflug during a week of flights from 11th to 15th of September.

Read more at our German live ticker.

Prof. Dr. Jens Günster from BAM and Thomas Mühler, PhD student from Clausthal University of Technology, preparing for their experiments on board of the zero-G plane.

Prof. Dr. Jens Günster from BAM and Thomas Mühler, PhD student from Clausthal University of Technology, preparing for their experiments on board of the zero-G plane.

Source: BAM, Section Corporate Communications

Background

Parabolic flights are used for scientific tests in microgravity and for testing space techniques. A DLR parabolic flight campaign usually consists of three flight days, each with four flight hours and 31 parabolas being flown in each. In parabolic flights, an aircraft rises steeply from the horizontal flight, throttles the thrust of the turbines and flies a parabola where weightlessness prevails for about 22 seconds. In total, approximately 35 minutes of weightlessness are available in a flight campaign – alternating with normal and double acceleration due to gravity, which researchers can use for their tests. Up to 40 scientists can participate in a flight, where generally 12 to 13 on-board experiments take place.